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This is absolutely the most chilling piece I've ever read about George W. Bush:

"Without a Doubt"
by Ron Suskind

It is, obviously, a partisan portrait, but it does attempt, I think, to show several sides of Bush, and how he's changed throughout his presidency, rather than just write him off as a stupid Republican. It's a really long article (it practically makes the TWOP recaps look concise), but I think it's definitely worth a read.

Here are some of the highlights (or lowlights, since this stuff terrified me to the core):

''This is why he dispenses with people who confront him with inconvenient facts,'' (Bruce) Bartlett went on to say. ''He truly believes he's on a mission from God. Absolute faith like that overwhelms a need for analysis. The whole thing about faith is to believe things for which there is no empirical evidence.'' Bartlett paused, then said, ''But you can't run the world on faith.''

...

The disdainful smirks and grimaces that many viewers were surprised to see in the first presidential debate are familiar expressions to those in the administration or in Congress who have simply asked the president to explain his positions. Since 9/11, those requests have grown scarce; Bush's intolerance of doubters has, if anything, increased, and few dare to question him now. A writ of infallibility -- a premise beneath the powerful Bushian certainty that has, in many ways, moved mountains -- is not just for public consumption: it has guided the inner life of the White House. As Whitman told me on the day in May 2003 that she announced her resignation as administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency: ''In meetings, I'd ask if there were any facts to support our case. And for that, I was accused of disloyalty!''

...

(Tom) Lantos went on to describe for the president how the Swedish Army might be an ideal candidate to anchor a small peacekeeping force on the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Sweden has a well-trained force of about 25,000. The president looked at him appraisingly, several people in the room recall.

''I don't know why you're talking about Sweden,'' Bush said. ''They're the neutral one. They don't have an army.''

Lantos paused, a little shocked, and offered a gentlemanly reply: ''Mr. President, you may have thought that I said Switzerland. They're the ones that are historically neutral, without an army.'' Then Lantos mentioned, in a gracious aside, that the Swiss do have a tough national guard to protect the country in the event of invasion.

Bush held to his view. ''No, no, it's Sweden that has no army.''

The room went silent, until someone changed the subject.

...

''Most successful people are good at identifying, very early, their strengths and weaknesses, at knowing themselves,'' (Biden) told me not long ago. ''For most of us average Joes, that meant we've relied on strengths but had to work on our weakness -- to lift them to adequacy -- otherwise they might bring us down. I don't think the president really had to do that, because he always had someone there -- his family or friends -- to bail him out. I don't think, on balance, that has served him well for the moment he's in now as president. He never seems to have worked on his weaknesses.''

Bush has been called the C.E.O. president, but that's just a catch phrase -- he never ran anything of consequence in the private sector. The M.B.A. president would be more accurate: he did, after all, graduate from Harvard Business School. And some who have worked under him in the White House and know about business have spotted a strange business-school time warp. It's as if a 1975 graduate from H.B.S. -- one who had little chance to season theory with practice during the past few decades of change in corporate America -- has simply been dropped into the most challenging management job in the world.

...

A cluster of particularly vivid qualities was shaping George W. Bush's White House through the summer of 2001: a disdain for contemplation or deliberation, an embrace of decisiveness, a retreat from empiricism, a sometimes bullying impatience with doubters and even friendly questioners. Already Bush was saying, Have faith in me and my decisions, and you'll be rewarded. All through the White House, people were channeling the boss. He didn't second-guess himself; why should they?

...

In the summer of 2002 ... I had a meeting with a senior adviser to Bush. He expressed the White House's displeasure, and then he told me something that at the time I didn't fully comprehend -- but which I now believe gets to the very heart of the Bush presidency.

The aide said that guys like me were ''in what we call the reality-based community,'' which he defined as people who ''believe that solutions emerge from your judicious study of discernible reality.'' I nodded and murmured something about enlightenment principles and empiricism. He cut me off. ''That's not the way the world really works anymore,'' he continued. ''We're an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality. And while you're studying that reality -- judiciously, as you will -- we'll act again, creating other new realities, which you can study too, and that's how things will sort out. We're history's actors . . . and you, all of you, will be left to just study what we do.''


::shudder::

Are we really going to elect this man to be our president for another four years? I understand if people don't really like Kerry much, but Bush's failure as a leader is pretty clear if you just look at his record. How can American voters not see that? What is wrong with us as a country that we'd allow ourselves to be taken in by this man?

Comments

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )
mcsister
Oct. 19th, 2004 07:17 am (UTC)
Wow. I'll have to go read the whole article later, but the lowlights are depressing enough. That conversation about Sweden? It would be funny if it wasn't so frightening that even on something like that nobody would step up and correct him. That explains a lot.
austin360
Oct. 19th, 2004 07:29 am (UTC)
And how is it that this election is so close? It eludes me.
cjcregg
Oct. 19th, 2004 07:49 am (UTC)
I think I'm going to be sick. I knew he was a twisted little man, but I didn't know it was this bad.
kinderny
Oct. 19th, 2004 08:34 am (UTC)
ok now I am depressed. I have pretty much successfully blocked out this presidency. sigh. It's all top down management and motivation thru fear. blcch.
( 4 comments — Leave a comment )

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